The benefits of knowing people in Mexican places

Yesterday I introduced you to Lesley of Mija Chronicles fame. She’s an expat living in Mexico City and she loves food, particularly that of the Mexican persuasion. She posted this recipe for Pan de Elote just a few weeks ago, I made it the day I read it. I’m sure  that gives you a good indication of how fantastic it is. I’m SO happy I made this. My waistline isn’t happy, well, I don’t think my waistline cares one way or the other. The mirror…, that’s a different story.

Moving on. I will redirect you to her post for the actual recipe, no need to re-invent the wheel. Believe me, you WANT to see her post. You may actually want to EAT her post, but I don’t think computer monitors will taste quite the same.  A few notes about the recipe and the steps to bring it together.

Her recipe was made with white corn, which is commonly available in Mexico, but I wasn’t able to find it here in Houston. The best I was able to get was 2-color fresh corn, but still, it was mostly yellow.

I was 1 ear of corn shy of 4 cups of husked corn kernels. Upon closer inspection, I only had 3 cps. Gulp. Unwilling to take such a massive risk, and because The Hubbz will always make an emergency run for me, I asked him to get me more cobs. Crisis averted.

Because I suck at following recipes, I missed the part where it said to grind HALF of the corn…, you should do that.

I did use the unsalted butter, but added a pinch of salt for that ying yang effect. I would also suggest using a bit less of the sugar since the US corn tends to be so sweet.

For this recipe you will beat the egg whites to punto de turrón or to soft peaks for the non-Spanish speakers. Check it out, I’m holding that bowl over my head.

And you want to fold these beautiful whites into the rest of the batter without losing all that cloudy fluff. So, take just a bit of the whites and mix them into the batter, then fold in the rest of the whites. This will make folding the two together easier and more uniform.

And when it baked for 55 minutes or so, it came out looking like this. Can you hear the choir? Aaaaaaaaaaaaah…

The Hubbz and I ate this in 2 days. I’m not proud of it, but this is about full disclosure. This isn’t cornbread as we know it here in the US, it’s not even the cakier version of it. This is a cross between a souffle and an angel food cake. Lesley describes it as a buttery corn cake, and it is all of those things. We especially enjoyed this cake with a bit of queso fresco sprinkled over the top. Ying Yang, baby.

Another keeper!

Cookingly yours,
Anamaris

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3 thoughts on “The benefits of knowing people in Mexican places

  1. Delicious and seemingly fairly easy to make. I wonder if using tofu would greatly diminish the recipe (I know it will noticeably change it). I’m just trying to figure out how I could veganize this for my partner so that I’m not the only one chowing down.

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